Skyler Oberst: The Journey of Work

I’m not here to tell you that once you make it to a certain point all things are wonderful. This is not that generic testimonial where I proudly say that “I’ve now arrived at being successful and you can be too!” In fact, I’m here to tell you something different…
 
I’d like you to consider what it means to be successful. It’s funny how when people reflect on the skills that brought them success, they tend to skip over the difficult and unpleasant realization that it’s hard work and can leave you scarred. Everyone will mention their first job of mowing lawns or working in a fast food restaurant but no one talks about how painful sunburns can be or how the hot grease from a fry machine can leave a pretty gnarly scar you if you’re not careful (believe me– it hurts!). Seldom do people want to hear these things because they’re more interested in the destination, thinking that they can make it there someday if they just had the right road map.
 
For me being successful is not a destination, but describes a way of moving through the world and interacting with people. That’s why work is so important. It’s a way of seeing every opportunity as a chance to grow into a better person. Successful people are the ones that are willing to put in the work to do the difficult and unpleasant things. Successful people do these things willingly because the work needs to be done and they see that discipline and fortitude are skills speak not only to their work but to their integrity. This type of tough work prepares you for life and when things don’t go the way they should. It’s good practice. Washing dishes or mopping floors have been some of the most rewarding experiences where I learned about the value of feeling like you accomplished something and the satisfaction of earning your keep. These lessons I learned I still apply whether in the boardroom or at home.
 
You can see this in the way strong leaders treat others, in the way they conduct themselves. And if you ask them… They may have some great lessons about the scars they picked up along the way. So why do I work? I work for the opportunity to enjoy the journey, learn the difficult lessons and savor each and every experience.
 

Share Why You Work
WhyWeWork@skils-kin.org