Here I sit, there you stand.

Written by: Jason Peterson, Front Desk Receptionist, Skils’kin

At first glance, this is a relatively simple statement, one of proximity. For some people, however, this simple statement describes two places that are worlds apart. In my heart, I am not one of those people. I have always believed that the only difference between my existence and anyone else’s, is that I make my way in the world from a sitting position.

Rather than pointing out the similarities we all share, I’m going to reverse engineer my perspective to shed light on the three obstacles that make it difficult for people with and without disabilities to see each other as equals. It’s basic human nature as we grow from children through adolescence that propels us across an invisible threshold into adulthood. This white-knuckle ride is not for the faint of heart. While zits rise and fall like tectonic plates and hair springs up like crabgrass, our young minds wrestle with the thoughts and feelings that will become the foundation blocks of who we are for the rest of our lives. Having a disability does not insulate you from the very same struggles and milestones as those of our non-disabled counterparts, nor does it mitigate any possible frustration or pain experienced during the pursuit of the very same. More often than not however, the disability adds an additional level of complexity to the overall journey.

***

The first obstacle is perspective. Perspective is a bit of a double edge sword. By that I mean, especially for someone with a disability, there are two overall viewpoints in play. First, the perspective of the outside world looking in. This group includes family, friends, and society at large. Second, “my” perspective, or another way to put this, is the perspective someone has about themselves, the internal looking out. In my experience, anyone with a lifelong disability is awfully familiar with the first type of perspective shortsightedness. It is common for those that love and care for us to do whatever they can to alleviate or minimize struggles we face on a day-to-day basis. You will see things such as: your auntie, while serving you dinner, cuts up your food. Your best friend, while handing you a soda, opens it for you, without being asked. These types of people do these things for us not because we can’t do them ourselves, but in most cases, because these tasks look difficult when we do them ourselves.

I say this with total love and admiration, not only for the organization, but also for all of the people that are the lifeblood of that organization. I was a Shriner’s Kid. While I cannot put a value on each individual stay, I know without a doubt, my independence today, is a direct result of the summer I spent as a therapy inpatient working with my Physical Therapist, Jerry White. At any time prior to that summer, you could have asked any of my friends or family what they saw for me after graduation. The resounding answer would have been, living at home with mom. Sadly, that probably would have been my answer as well. In the course of three and a half months and gallons of sweat and tears, Jerry completely changed my internal perspective by opening my eyes and my mind to a world where I was capable of doing more than I ever thought I could. My future freedom was in the palm of my hand. I started that summer a little fat kid in a wheelchair that couldn’t do much for himself. I went home at the end of the summer, still a little fat kid, still in a wheelchair, but with direction, purpose, and drive for my future.

***

The second obstacle is passing value-based judgments, that is when somebody sees a person with a disability as something broken. I call these people “value-judges.” Sadly, this happens quite often within the disabled community; typically, this occurs with no malice or overt pain intended by the value-judge. In much the same way as perspective, value judgments are perpetrated both internally and externally. Through no fault of our own, people with disabilities may move slower, talk slower, think slower, or generally have more difficulty accomplishing tasks of any kind. The most unnerving attribute of the value-judge is that they can be the nicest person in the world otherwise. This behavior and way of thinking is more insidious than overt bullying because the disabled person can begin to internalize these ideas and in turn begin to believe that having a disability makes their life defective in some way.

In my 44 years of life, sadly, I am all too familiar with the value-judge’s manner of thinking. On a very regular basis, people assume that being in a power chair also means I have cognitive disabilities as well. Throughout my life I have had several friends both in manual and electric wheelchairs, and almost without fail, those of us in the power chairs, will be treated as though we are cognitively impaired by unenlightened newcomers. Conversely, however, the same automatic assumption is very rarely made for individuals in manual chairs. Additionally, the value-judge is usually overly empathetic. On one occasion, I was at the grocery store when a complete stranger walked up to me and offered to purchase my groceries. This stranger said to me, “Excuse me sir, I know your life must be hard because of your wheelchair and I would like to purchase what is in your basket for you.” Inside, I immediately bristled. Outside, I held it together and politely declined his offer. On another occasion, while sitting on the sidewalk waiting for my para-transit pick up, an older couple walked by me, and I heard the lady say to her husband, “Isn’t that sad, a blind man in a power chair.” What?  It may be worth mentioning that I was wearing dark sunglasses that day. While I did find the comment to be funny, this assumption is indubitably harmful. When in the presence of the value-judge, you can’t help but to feel more disabled than you actually are.

***

Finally, we reach the third obstacle. This one is also a bit of a soapbox issue for me. Lowered expectations. While I don’t have children yet, I am fully aware of the natural inclination of loving families to feel let down when first learning their child has a disability. This is then followed by the innate fear of putting too much pressure and expectations on their disabled child. It is true. Your son has cerebral palsy and will probably never play school sports or ride a bike in the traditional sense. Your daughter has Down Syndrome and may never be a neurosurgeon or join the military. Being diagnosed with a disability does not end expectations; it changes expectations. By lowering expectations to alleviate struggle, the child with a disability is also robbed of opportunities to develop self-worth. Confidence and self-worth are the direct result of experiencing struggle. Struggle leads to achievement and achievement leads pride in one’s self. How are we to expect more for ourselves if more is not expected from us?

The need for fair expectations is especially important where employment is concerned. For many disabled employees, myself included, arriving to work each day is the last link in a complex chain of events that must occur for us to claim our peace of the wage earner’s pie. The reality is a large majority of people with disabilities depend on care providers, medications, various therapies, and a plethora of medical professionals to help maintain our daily lives. The vast majority of these needs are not covered by job offered medical plans. Those of us that have the ability and choose to work, are forced to maintain the delicate balance between gross monthly earnings & hours worked and staying eligible for Medicaid/Medicare. Too often it is assumed that people with disabilities choose not to work because they don’t want to. While this may be true for some, it is certainly not true for all.

I sincerely hope I have successfully dispelled possible “us” and “them” ideas where people with disabilities are concerned. Life is a continuum with varying degrees of ability. Like the aperture of a camera lets in more or less light based on size, think of your perspective as the aperture of your heart and mind; keep your perspective on those around you wide open so you do not miss any light. Never be afraid to expect greatness from someone that is different from you. The path to success might be different from the one you would have chosen, but those differences may also provide crucial opportunities for learning something new. At the end of the day, a closed mind is the biggest disability of them all.

5 Ways to Ace Any Interview

Written by: Elizabeth Harney, Social Media Manager, Skils’kin

 

An eager Front Desk Agent in a big-chain hotel in town, I found myself wanting more. Seeking a challenge and a career, I began applying for positions just outside my skill set. That’s when I saw it – Human Resources Coordinator at Skils’kin. While I knew my resume wasn’t necessarily the most competitive for the role, I couldn’t stop thinking about my future at Skils’kin.  The next day, I was over the moon to accept an interview offer. Did I interview perfectly? No. Did I know all the answers? Absolutely not. Did I think I would get the job offer, a mere 2 hours after I walked out of the conference room? No.

At the time, I didn’t know why they offered me the job. In my next almost two years as a Human Resources Coordinator, I reviewed countless resumes and cover letters, met job seekers, and spent entire weeks running interviews. That’s when I finally learned why my manager gave me a chance after my interview.

1. Be your authentic self

When the stress of the job hunt has you thinking: “I’ll take any job,” it’s time to take a step back. You will likely spend more time at work than you do at home. When you enter your interview, don’t pretend to be what you think the company wants. Show the employer who you are and what you are passionate about. Consider if this company is a place you can find happiness in your work. A successful job placement goes both ways.

2. Don’t be afraid of your weaknesses

Towards the end of my interview at Skils’kin, the hiring manager told me he was going to read out a list of fifteen HR related acronyms and I would tell him what they meant. I didn’t even get half of them right. Instead of completely giving up hope, I admitted: “I know I didn’t do very well on these, but I promise I am a very quick learner and I will learn them all.” I acknowledged my weakness and made a commitment to improve. A commitment to growth and learning goes a long way for hiring managers.

3. Know your long-term goals

It’s okay if you don’t know what exactly you want to do, but you need to know how you’re going to get there. Tell the interviewer exactly what skills you want to grow and develop. Tell them what you want in a career. You don’t need to know which specific job you want in five or ten years, but you do need to know what you want to work on.

4. Research the company

As a former recruiter, I can’t stress this enough. There is nothing more disappointing than asking a candidate their opinions about the company, for them to say they don’t really know what we do. Why would I hire you if you don’t care about our company?

Do your research. Check Facebook. Check LinkedIn. Peek at the hiring manager/recruiter’s LinkedIn. Look for YouTube Videos about the company. Check Glassdoor. Know their mission, their values, and what services they offer.

5. Hype yourself up

We all get nervous before an interview. It is easy to give into the feelings of uncertainty and anxiety. Instead of allowing it to consume you, I challenge you to hype yourself up. Listen to loud music. Search for motivating videos online. Jump up and down. Look in the mirror and say out loud all the things that make you amazing. Tell yourself they would be lucky to hire you, that you are smart, that you are capable.

Person holding a compass in their hand, Skils'kin logo in top left

Following Our True North Despite COVID-19

Author: Mary Stevenson, VP of State Programs, Skils’kin

When COVID-19 hit and the governor declared a state of emergency, we found ourselves facing something we had never encountered before. Despite my over 15 years in the social service profession, and the combined centuries of experiences of my team, we found ourselves looking at a challenge that none of us had faced ever before.

As we started to learn more about the virus and the level of social distancing it would take to slow the spread, so many thoughts ran through my mind; what would the immediate impact be and what are the long-lasting implications? Information was changing minute to minute and instantaneous adaptation was needed. The initial thoughts centered around how to provide the highest quality services while keeping everyone safe. How can we maintain the relationships we have with those we serve, continue their progress toward real and meaningful goals, and how do we help our now deemed essential workers in the community and assure they had supports to maintain employment? We planned out several options; no longer providing services was never an option, nor was it discussed. We soon learned this was not the approach every provider took, in fact, several agencies stopped providing services immediately and some are still closed today.

When I announced to my team that we were going fully remote, effective immediately, I could see on their faces they realized the depth of the situation. Every person on the team went home and started contacting clients and informing them that our doors at our physical address would be closed. We would be supporting them with remote services, but our dedication and the support we provide to them would not waiver. We assured them we are there for them and in this together with them. We confirmed that we would continue working on goals and have regular contact. Our commitment to serve meant a great deal to each of them.

In the same way, my thoughts swirled around what the evolution of our services were about to undergo to meet the new needs. I saw those around me focus on that same goal. The Leadership team at Skils’kin was not slowing down services, instead we focused on continued growth and opportunity. We are bound to the mission in such a way that when this disaster struck, it was a muscle memory response to adapt and serve. This group of people are at Skils’kin because of that belief.

It is not every day that you get the opportunity to know what you are genuinely made of.
It is not every day that you find out how dedicated your team truly is to the mission.
It is not every day that you find out what is truly at the center of your organization. 

The state and federal funding partners did not immediately issue guidance on how services were to be delivered. Even without knowing how we were moving forward, we were still all driven to continue following the mission. The mission is who we are, and nothing, not even a global pandemic could change who we are at our core, nor could it change our grit. In this moment, I realized how deep our commitment lives and that it is our true north. Without pause or hesitation, we all knew we would find solutions because our “why” drives us. We have been building our plane while in flight. We empowered our employment team to find ways to adapt services as they focused on serving their clients to include investing in technology that would make remote services accessible.

Dedication isn’t just in our employees, but our clients as well. Clients are working in health care, grocery stores, laundry facilities, and providing essential services on our military bases; they never faltered in their commitment to their employment. Employment is powerful. Employment is a connection to our community.

Now, a little over 90 days later, we have rolled out an “In It to Win It” client employment development program that elevates our services to the next level. It is now the cornerstone of our training and job readiness program. We are implementing an individual goal-centered curriculum as a tool for job readiness with a focus on essential worker skills for those wanting to work during the pandemic and support their communities. This program is built with the individual client in mind with a fully tailored curriculum for each individual we serve. This is just the beginning.

We see the possibilities that remote services brings and we realize we are going to need to utilize this format for some time to varying degrees. We will not tread water and wait for the storm to pass. We will continue to innovate and collaborate to drive our services and capabilities even further. We will continue to adapt and provide the highest quality supports and services.

Over the next several months, as our community rebuilds and reopens, it will be the dedicated employees and businesses that will lead to recovery. After the 2008 recession, it was employment services that were matched opportunities from the communities with valued, talented employees and helped facilitate the turnaround in local economies. Today, we are committed to finding those opportunities for the people we serve and supporting them to find their “why.”

Now I know. Now I know who I am, who my team is, who Skils’kin is, and what our shared true north is. You may think you know who you are and what you stand for; when you are ultimately tested and you do not bend, you do not waiver, then you genuinely know. It is humbling. It is life-affirming. It is the gift of insight.

We are Skils’kin. We know our true north. We understand the value of work.

We have been here for 50 years and we are poised to remain a cornerstone for many more to come.

Accounting Solutions for Supported Living Providers by Paragon

Accounting Solutions for Supported Living Providers by Paragon

History of Residential Care Specialization

Paragon staff have a long history of serving the residential care industry. We specialize in back office accounting solutions for supported living providers, skilled nursing, adult family homes, and other residential locations. We partner with numerous providers that serve clients in these types of settings.

Throughout the United States, Paragon works with providers of supported living programs regardless of location. We understand the need for accurate and timely reporting, individual financial plan tracking, shared expense reconciliations, eligibility reviews, and other processes specific to these populations.

Robust Systems and Processes

Paragon utilizes specialized accounting and case management software that is specifically customized for our back-end services, allowing us to implement collective bank accounts and enhance the client experience. Our system has substantial reporting capabilities that help us track spending and shared housing expenses, and report on activity for each client individually, grouped by housing units and program level. The system also allows for tracking of case notes, contact information, and a full suite of demographic and diagnostic data.

We have also implemented a fully electronic document retention system. This system allows us to capture images for all bills, receipts and other client-related documents, which are then fully searchable and routed to the appropriate staff on our team. This system is secure and backed up regularly.

Trust and Accountability

Paragon’s accounting solutions for supported living providers furnish these benefits:

  • Reduced financial risk, oversight, responsibilities, and costs.
  • Direct communication and reporting to Social Security and State agencies for annual reviews, accounting, audits, and benefit renewals.
  • Full assistance with Individual Financial Plan (IFP) creation and modification.
  • Prompt payment of invoices, distribution of budgeted funds, and as-needed expenditure requests with monthly transactional reporting.
  • Use of pre-paid VISA® debit cards with a full suite of administrative tools that include security alerts, real-time transaction details, and card history.
  • Utilization of a specialized accounting and reporting software to schedule, transact, and track all client income and disbursements.
  • Paperless Scanning Technology

Power in Partnership

We focus on what we do best: excellence in managing the finances of your clients. Partnering with Paragon enables you to focus on what you do best: excellence in supporting the individuals in your care to pursue an enriched life.

A Paragon solution provides the best support possible. We reduce your responsibility for client financial management and provide an additional layer of control and accountability. Choosing Paragon as your partner will provide considerable peace of mind, minimize in-house financial responsibilities, and provide significant financial benefit with a direct positive impact to your organization’s bottom line.

Pre-paid VISA® Debit Card

We work with supported living providers to minimize or eliminate the handling of checks and cash in homes. The use of our pre-paid debit card reduces the risk of handling cash and allows for more detailed reporting of transactions, facilitating painless account reconciliation.

We load our pre-paid VISA® debit cards with budgeted weekly/monthly personal spending (groceries, hygiene, recreation, personal needs), enabling your teams to assist your clients in making purchases wherever VISA® is accepted, including online.

Our pre-paid VISA® debit cards are isolated from your clients’ main accounts, and will only be able to access funds that are specifically loaded to the card.

We provide your teams with a full suite of administrative tools, including security alerts, the ability to view real-time full transaction details, card history, and the ability to report lost cards and order replacements. We even have the capacity to provide instant issue cards to avoid any delays if a pre-paid card is lost or damaged.

Providing Outstanding Care

These systems help us to perform our services in the highest quality manner with considerable efficiency, allowing us to provide significant financial benefit to your organization’s bottom-line while providing for better segregation of duties and internal controls. This in turn gives your teams more freedom to focus on providing outstanding care.

We look forward to discussing your needs to see how our accounting solutions can help improve your service levels and cost structure. Please call or email Mark London, Vice President of Marketing at (509) 319-1419 or by email at mlondon@skils-kin.org.

Environmental Cleaning & Disinfectant Services

Environmental Cleaning & Disinfectant Services

New Service Offering

In light of COVID-19, Skils’kin Commercial Services is offering environmental cleaning and disinfectant services for non-healthcare facilities. Organizations such as schools, offices, daycare centers, businesses, community centers, and public municipalities that have either been exposed or potentially exposed to COVID-19 are eligible for this service.

Protocol

Commercial Services has implemented a comprehensive protocol based on CDC guidelines for deep cleaning & sanitization to combat against the COVID-19 virus.

Vertical and horizontal nonporous surfaces:

  • Any surface vertical or horizontal that comes in contact with building occupants will be addressed.
  • Visibly dirty surfaces will be cleaned using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Once surfaces are adequately clean surfaces will be wiped down using Microban Medi-Clean commercial disinfectant. MSDS sheets provided.
  • Care is to be taken not to shake loose content in the environmental space; this will minimize the possibility of dispersing virus though the air.

Vertical and horizontal porous surfaces:

  • Surfaces covered by a porous fabric such as but not limited to carpet, cubicle walls, chairs and window covering.
  • All porous surfaces will be pre-vacuumed with true EPA rated HEPA vacuum machines suitable for asbestos and mold remediation standards.
  • All porous surfaces will be treated with Microban Medi-Clean commercial disinfectant. MSDS sheets provided.
  • Care is to be taken not to shake loose content in the environmental space; this willminimize the possibility of dispersing virus though the air.

Personal Protective Equipment

We take every precaution to insulate our cleaning staff from environmental hazards:

  • Cleaning staff will be equipped with disposable gloves and suits for all tasks in the cleaning process.
  • PPE will be compatible with disinfectant products used.
  • Additional PPE may be required based on environment and products being used.
  • Gloves and suits will be removed carefully to avoid possible contamination of the wearer and surrounding environment.
  • Hands will be cleaned immediately following removal of PPE.

Cleaning and Disinfectant Services Rates

Application of disinfectant via airless sprayer and or ULV fogging device:

  • Price $.10 per square foot of building space.
  • Minimum charge $275.00.

Note This option does not follow CDC recommendations for environmental cleaning and disinfection.

Environmental cleaning and disinfection in accordance with environmental cleaning and disinfection protocol for Coronavirus (COVID-19):

  • Hourly rate for 2 persons including disinfectant, cleaning equipment, and personal protective equipment.
  • Rate based on square feet of building area, $.47 per sq. ft. $550.00 minimum.
  • Rate for prevailing wage contracts based on bldg square footage. $.52 per sq ft. $550.00 minimum.

Note This option complies with recommendations for environmental cleaning and disinfection set forth by the U.S. Center for Disease Control.

To Schedule an Estimate

Our environmental cleaning and disinfectant services team looks forward to discussing your needs. Please call or email CS Operations Manager, Nichole Garcia.

(509) 326.6760 ext. 2665
ngarcia@skils-kin.org

Raised Credentials

Christopher Borck and Timothy Taylor are two Commercial Services crew members who have both worked at Skils’kin for several years. As Skils’kin’s Commercial Services grows so does their need for skilled employees.
 
Skils’kin is committed to being an incubator of leadership and talent. Last December both Christopher and Timothy decided they wanted to certify their skills through training. They both registered for a forklift driving class using their annual $250 Skils’kin Education Reimbursement. They wanted to take this class to broaden their skillset, or if Commercial Services gained a new partner that would require a forklift driver, they could be first in line for the job.
 
The certification was provided through Norlift in Spokane. The one day class covered PPE/Safety, inspections, repair, mechanics, load balance and placement, approach, and loading on and off of trailers. The material was taught in a classroom setting with video instruction to supplement, and a course test finished the class, including an obstacle course. The test required them to inspect and drive a forklift through a slalom course of cones forward and backward, and lift an empty pallet and move it.
 
Both Timothy and Christopher passed the forklift tests and are now OSHA certified operators. Timothy and Christopher want to use their certifications to help guide the next steps on their career paths. Presently, both still work at Skils’kin, and for the time being, the Commercial Service department has helped develop two highly skilled employees.
 
If you’re a Skils’kin employee and want to further your skills personally or professionally ask your manager about the Skils’kin Education Reimbursement fund.

Commercial Services Partners With G and T Sales Fast Frame Kit Assembly

 

Commercial Services is always adaptable and ready to take on new projects. G&T Sales has been in the framing business for over 20 years with their The Fast Framer Kit, including all the necessary parts for the construction of small sheds or storage spaces. The kit comes with everything except the lumber. Commercial services developed an assembly system to package together kits, as a trusted partner of G & T Sales. They are manufacturers of Fast Framer Kits, Quick Framer Kits, and Dog House Framer Kits for framing anything you can think of – sheds, greenhouses, tool sheds, wood sheds, window boxes, garden trellis and much more.

If you are interested in local customized assembly, production, and shipping services contact VP of Commercial Services, Steve McBride 509.326.6760 x 2579

Skils’kin Assists Neighborhood Revitalization

Skils’kin has found success through our connections and investment in the community. Through the combined support of concerned families and business leaders, Skils’kin came to be in 1970. Since then our continuing commitment to work together with our many friends and business partners in the community has created immense success. As Skils’kin’s headquarters is located in Spokane we constantly work to live and give back to the many communities in this area. Spokane is made up of its many diverse neighborhoods. While Skils’kin is a part of many of these communities, the Commercial Services team recently made a monumental contribution to the West Central Neighborhood.

 

West Central has been a staple throughout Spokane’s history. Near the turn of the century, the majority of the neighborhood’s houses were built, and have remained standing since. The community was vibrant and filled with the blue-collar workers of the railroad industry. For years this was considered a cornerstone neighborhood of the city. During the early 1970s, Spokane experienced large economic changes and the booming commerce of the railroads declined rapidly. Due to layoffs and the rising cost of living, the West Central neighborhood began to fall into disarray and was dubbed Felony Flats as the abandoned rail yard became a hub for crime. In the early 1990s, a group of community activists came together to reclaim their once beloved neighborhood. Action was taken through community development, remodeled homes, C.O.P.S. (Community Oriented Policing Services), and new business development. West Central experienced a rebirth.

Revitalization of the West Central Neighborhood has taken time and investment from the community and is still underway today. There have been many players, and Skils’kin is proud to have contributed to Dutch Jake’s Park. Through our experience with public works projects, the Commercial Services crew was prepared to work as a contractor, while expanding our services and knowledge. On this project, we provided labor, laying down 26,000 square feet of sod, and assisted assembling the irrigation system. Starting in October of 2019, a small team began to move rocks and soil to create a level field for the play structure. During this time an irrigation system was also assembled underground. Molly Lorenzo, Commercial Services Supervisor, could feel the community connection during the project, “It was a great experience and we learned a lot… Neighbors would come by and check-in on the progress. The neighborhood was supportive.”

November 21st, 2019 was the grand reopening of Dutch Jake’s Park. It was a vibrant event on a sunny brisk day in West Central. Mayor David Condon spoke about the obvious success of the beautification project, and how much he personally enjoyed the new play structures earlier that morning. He was then followed by community members and businesses honoring the neighborhood and the many invested players in taking ownership. A community-based marching band then took the field and played off the event as families and community members enjoyed the park.

Skils’kin Commercial Services crew: Brandon Skocilich, Molly Lorenzo, Aethena Doney and Aaron Hatman

“A Place to Call Home” in the Eyes of Skils’kin

The Spokane Civic Theatre debuted an original play telling the story of the Hutton Settlement, and Skils’kin is happy to share news about our talented staff being a part of the production and filming of “A Place to Call Home.”

Skils’kin was contracted to film Spokane Civic Theatre’s production of “A Place to Call Home.” The story follows the life of Levi “Al” Hutton and the creation of Hutton Home/Settlement. This production was part of an anniversary celebration called 100 Years of Hutton. Zack Rosse, Marketing Manager, filmed the production for Marketing to assemble an archival video. Additional production of editing and creating an animated opening for the video was also implemented by Mike Ellsworth, Media Specialist. Skils’kin’s Melody Deatherage, HR Business Partner/Benefits Specialist, starred in the production as well. Additionally, Lark Mack took photographs of “A Place to Call Home.”

Skils’kin was excited to be involved in this historical process. Thank you Spokane Civic Theatre and the Hutton Settlement for letting us be part of this production.

Why We Work: Lark Mack

Skils’kin has added another esteemed employee to our Why We Work campaign. Lark Mack is one of the front desk admins at the Boone Headquarters in Spokane, Washington. She has been with Skils’kin for about 5 and a half years. During that time her life has gone through some momentous changes which are notably positive: procuring a driver’s license, getting married, and excelling in her photography are just a few examples.
 
Lark has been on the up-and-up since starting at Skils’kin. She is a valued team member and a wonderful person. Her can-do, positive attitude allows her to excel in her position. When she has an idea or method or is asked about a project; she is known to provide valuable input. In the last few years, Lark has applied her best self in her efforts at Skils’kin.
 
All these qualities mentioned and all she says in the video holds important work lessons. They are all reasons why she is an exemplary candidate to represent Skils’kin. Then she does so with a warm greeting to all who enter our doors.
 
Another notable fact about this video is a production change. Usually, Marketing Manager Zack Rosse is our Videographer, but this time HR Manager Ian Graves generated questions, conducted the interview and filmed Lark’s responses. Zack compiled and edited the footage and finalized the video. Watch and find out why Lark works.
 
Thank you, Lark, for sharing your views and all your contributions to Skils’kin. Additionally, thank you, Ian, for helping to bring this project to fruition and all you add to Skils’kin. And thank you, Zack, for polishing the footage. Teamwork is alive and well at Skils’kin.
 

 
If you would like to contribute to the “Why We Work” campaign, submit your story to: WhyWeWork@skils-kin.org